Usually, an emulsifying agent, such as soy lecithin, is added, though a few manufacturers prefer to exclude this ingredient for purity reasons and to remain GMO-free, sometimes at the cost of a perfectly smooth texture. Some manufacturers are now using PGPR, an artificial emulsifier derived from castor oil that allows them to reduce the amount of cocoa butter while maintaining the same mouthfeel.
Jeni, I am SO SORRY! I had one other comment in the last month about the same thing. Two things that may have affected the dessert. 1. I got so much flack about the original pudding recipe having 1 Tbsp of cornstarch (or arrowroot) in it that I reduced the amount a few months ago. I have recently changed it back to the original quantity. 2. If the pudding isn’t cooked enough, it won’t set properly. So, unfortunately, you were a victim of one or both.

My numbers are all excellent. Take a look at my page on the cholesterol myth where I summarise some fabulous books on the subject. Once you go low carb, your triglycerides drop, HDL goes up and LDL becomes the larger fluffy type instead of the small oxidised destructive type. This is an incredible simplification but have a read and see what you think.
I just made this over the past 2 days, and I’m curious if the pudding will stiffen up again after being mixed with the almond milk? It had such a great pudding consistency and then when I added the almond milk it became very runny, so then it was difficult to put the whipped cream layer on top. All of the layers have been super delicious! I hope that the crust will still be good even though I didn’t bake it. I wasn’t thinking and wish I had. Thanks so much!
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Hi Jason. It depends on what your definition of healthy is. If it needs to be under 200 calories per serving then you will need to cut this dessert into smaller pieces. It is very rich and very filling so if you are serving it to kids, you could easily cut it into 24 pieces. My definition of “Healthy” is sugar-free and made from scratch with wholesome ingredients and little added chemicals. If your definition of healthy is low calorie and low fat, then this dessert is not for you. There are many recipes for Chocolate Lasagna or Chocolate Layered Dessert on-line which would meet your needs. You could make it very cheaply buy buying low fat cookies, cream cheese, low fat pudding and low fat coolwhip. As far as costing the dessert… I calculated the nutritional data in a recipe program but I did not cost it out. You will have to do that yourself depending on how you want to make the recipe. If you have any more questions, let me know. Have a great day! -Kim
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Thank you so much for this recipe! A lot of steps – all necessary – but so worth it. This is the best low carb dessert I’ve had! My parents, sister, and I all loved it. I made one change. I stabilized the whipped cream with gelatin, since it will take us a few days to eat it all, and I was afraid it might get watery. I don’t know if that was necessary or not. And you did say that it freezes well. Again, thanks for all your effort perfecting this wonderful dessert!
To sweeten "sugar-free" chocolate, most companies use maltitol, a sugar alcohol that is 90% as sweet as sugar ("sugar alcohol" is a somewhat misleading term, as these are neither sugar nor alcohol). This type of sugar replacer (a group that also includes sorbitol, xylitol, mannitol, and isomalt) is particularly helpful to people with diabetes, because only a portion of it is digested and absorbed. And the part that is absorbed through the intestinal tract is absorbed slowly, so there's a relatively little rise in blood sugar.

The big pro to this diet is that it’s very heart-friendly; the con is that for some people, the lure of a low-carb diet is often the ability to eat highly palatable foods, like bacon and cheese. Research analyzing the benefit of a low-carb Mediterranean diet on diabetes, such as one study published in July 2014 in the journal Diabetes Care, have advised participants to keep carbohydrates to no more than 50 percent of their daily calories and get at least 30 percent of their calories from fat, focusing on vegetables and whole grains as carb sources.
A one-tablespoon (5 grams) serving of dry unsweetened cocoa powder has 12.1 mg of caffeine[89] and a 25-g single serving of dark chocolate has 22.4 mg of caffeine.[90] Although a single 7 oz. serving of coffee may contain 80–175 mg,[91] studies have shown psychoactive effects in caffeine doses as low as 9 mg,[92] and a dose as low as 12.5 mg was shown to have effects on cognitive performance.[93]
Hi Kelly, All packaged foods will have a nutrition label that list the macros per serving, including fat, protein and cabrohydrates. Net carbs, which is what most people look at for low carb and keto, are total carbs (the amount on the label) minus fiber and sugar alcohols, as explained in the article above. I have a low carb food list here that gives you a full list of all the foods you can eat, and the net carbs in each. You can also sign up above to be notified about the meal plans, which are a great way to get started.
A low carb diet plan is a way of eating that is high in fat, moderate in protein and low in carbohydrates. There are different variations of low carb, and the keto diet is a special type of low carb with added characteristics. The number of carbohydrates will vary depending on your insulin tolerance and activity level, but on average, these are the common numbers of carbs:
Studies have shown that people losing weight with a low-carbohydrate diet, compared to a low-fat diet, have very slightly more weight loss initially, equivalent to approximately 100kcal/day, but that the advantage diminishes over time and is ultimately insignificant.[6] The Endocrine Society state that "when calorie intake is held constant [...] body-fat accumulation does not appear to be affected by even very pronounced changes in the amount of fat vs carbohydrate in the diet."[6]
Hi. I tried making the zucchini tortillas for the first time this week. They did cook and sort of brown, but they did not look as golden color as the ones in your picture. Also, the inside did not seem to cook as much and was still like the batter. So the outside was dry and cooked but the inside was mostly uncooked. Where did I go wrong? I want to try it again!
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