Hi I’m only new to LCHF and you’re information has been amazing, thank you! I have one question though I’m doing well cutting out sugar, breads etc but just wondering do I need to portion control my meals? Typically I have a 2 egg one letter with cheese, spinach and mushrooms for breakfast. Then warm chicken salad with rocket, cucumber, tomatoes, Persia fetta and a poaxhed egg. Dinner yellow curry with brocoli, carrot on cauliflower rice. Snack a low carb cheesecake, nuts maybe a smoothie.
The base of this recipe is cacao butter (also known as cocoa butter), which is a creamy fat that is solid at room temperature. It may be available at a health food store, but I get mine on Amazon. If you can't find cacao butter, you can use coconut oil. However, if you do use oil, you must keep the chocolates chilled, even once they are set. Coconut oil will be too soft at room temperature.  
While the crust is cooling, make the chocolate pudding layer. In a medium saucepan, combine the heavy cream, almond milk, sugar-free dark chocolate, butter, and powdered erythritol. Cook over medium-low to low heat, stirring frequently, until the chocolate is melted and sweetener dissolves (about 5-10 minutes). Be careful not to get the heat too high to avoid burning the chocolate.

Severely restricting carbohydrates to less than 0.7 ounces (20 grams) a day can result in a process called ketosis. Ketosis occurs when you don't have enough sugar (glucose) for energy, so your body breaks down stored fat, causing ketones to build up in your body. Side effects from ketosis can include nausea, headache, mental and physical fatigue, and bad breath.
My husband and I did sugar-free January, including giving up honey and maple syrup (we did keep wine and unsweetened dried fruit!). It was hard at times, but ultimately super rewarding for both of us! We both dropped a few lbs., and I was able to kick my gross flavored-coffeemate-plus-an-extra-spoonful-of-sugar habit, and am now drinking my coffee unsweetened with just a big splash of half and half (thanks for that tip!).
Hi, Nicole, nice to meet you. Thank you so much for feeling comfortable enough to ask. Yes, I use the Stevia glycerite to bump up the sweetness. There are very few Stevias I like. I like this one and a concentrated Stevia called KAL Pure Stevia. They taste the very best. However, there is always an adjustment period with Stevia. I have a good article about the best low carb sweeteners and how to use them (located under “Articles” on the site menu).
Hi Libby. Re foods to eat. Still a newbie and exploring all this. Re the foods for example cocnut cream- is there a specific brand or type you,should buy? Same with butter and meats- re grass fed versus grain fed. Coconut oil- is there ones you should or shouldn’t use brand wise. Lchf site says grass fed meat and butter. Does it have to say organic on the butter. Labelling is really bad in regards to this. And your cheeses- re Brie for,example- are they all they same or are there certain ones of them you have to buy ? This goes for all cheese that you can have to- are there ones better for you than others?
Not all dairy is created equal, though. "Dairy foods have natural sugar called lactose, so not everything in this group is low-carb," says Blatner. Milk isn't particularly low-carb, and flavored yogurts often contain sugar, which ups the carb count. (And obviously, ice cream also isn't low-carb approved.) Go for plain yogurt varieties and flavor them with a squeeze of lime, suggests Brissette, or a low-carb fruit.
Hi Silvy, these are quite common concerns when starting out low carb. By increasing your healthy fats you will feel full and satiated for longer, than quick burning carbs. You will also reap all the health benefits from lowering your carbs, eating good quality protein and increasing your fats from healthy sources. It may take a while for your appetite to adapt to be running on more fat than carbs, but it is so incredibly wonderful to finally be off the high/low sugar roller coaster. Good luck with starting out and join us on Facebook for daily tips and subscribe for free recipes when I post them. Libby 🙂
The treat that now lies quietly in its wrapper carries a story of exotic places, long journeys and small families that raise delicate tropical fruit trees. As you peel back the wrapper, you’re uncovering the cacao tree’s seed—and joining people the world over who have turned to this mysterious food for ritual, medicine and sheer pleasure for the past 4,000 years.

I am confused. Vitafiber is an IMO. It gets broken down like sugar and therefore you don’t use it? Then why did you recommend it? This recipe is for a low carb chocolate bar. I am on a ketogenic diet. I ordered this stuff specifically because you recommended it. How am I supposed to calculate the carbs? Does it have an effect on blood sugar? If inulin is better, why not use that. Could you please clarify. Also, if Vitafiber is not good for people who are on a very low carb diet, you may want to include a note up in the text of the recipe so that people understand that it won’t work for a ketogenic diet. Please don’t interpret this as an angry comment. I am genuinely confused and would like to know how to proceed (i.e. should I return the Vitafiber and not eat the chocolate that I made with it). I would really appreciate your reply.


Hi Libby. Re foods to eat. Still a newbie and exploring all this. Re the foods for example cocnut cream- is there a specific brand or type you,should buy? Same with butter and meats- re grass fed versus grain fed. Coconut oil- is there ones you should or shouldn’t use brand wise. Lchf site says grass fed meat and butter. Does it have to say organic on the butter. Labelling is really bad in regards to this. And your cheeses- re Brie for,example- are they all they same or are there certain ones of them you have to buy ? This goes for all cheese that you can have to- are there ones better for you than others? 

Firstly read the “How to start” page which will cover how to start slowly and give up the most obvious places of sugar first, then cut back on all carbs such as bread, pasta, rice, starchy vegetables etc. You must also cut back on all seed oils such as canola, sunflower, margarine, spreads etc. These cause inflammation. Go back to healthy fats such as olive oil, butter, coconut oil, etc. Take a look at the lists on the page. To make your own meal plan, take a look at all my breakfast, lunch and dinner recipes. Choose which ones are easy to start with such as scrambled eggs for breakfast, salad and last nights dinner for lunch, and dinner meals made the low carb way. Join us on Facebook and Pinterest too for more ideas and suggestions. Good luck xxx
Any suggestions for butterscotch pudding to make this with? We always made a half chocolate (on one side not mixed) and half butterscotch which was personal favorites with this combo. No idea where to begin making butterscotch pudding. Will have to research I suppose. BTW we call this Maxine for some reason through our families recipe of this. But I totally get better than sex too. It’s so yummy.
Oh how I wish I had read the comments before I attempted this.. brand new spring form leaked considerably while I was out of the kitchen.. house filled with smoke, etc. had to pull the cake out of fhe oven half way through..clean the oven etc By the time it went back in the oven it didn’t have a chance and had already sunken in. Onto attempt #2 stay tuned. ..
Example 2: Last year, during the middle of Sugar Free January, Bjork and I went on vacation to Hawaii. This time I had decided to take a more flexible approach, so I drank lots of (very sweet) fresh fruit juice, and I had a Coke on the beach, and we split one dessert together. I was aware of what I was eating, and while it made coming back to sugar free eating a little more difficult, it didn’t derail my Sugar Free January experience. It was just a different, more flexible approach.
Absolutely go for the wine! As long as you go for an unsweetened wine and limit yourself. I only have a glass at the weekends as I know all my good intentions go out the window once I’ve had a glass and it’s harder to say no to more dark chocolate. If your weight loss ever stalls, you may need to reassess how many glasses you have as the alcohol will always be metabolised before anything else so weight loss will often stop. As for gluten, all my recipes are naturally gluten free because all my recipes are grain free. Read my post on Gluten free vs Grain free to truly understand. Beware of GF products because they are so high in carbs because they are made with rice flour, tapioca starch etc. And remember, gluten free junk is still junk 😉 Good luck Mary, keep coming back and asking questions.

I give 4 stars for the effort to make something good for the diabetes patients.The only thing I did not like at this product is that the sweetness is way TOO strong. These is a problem with most of the American sweet products. I just want to remind to the Americans that the sweet products should have more taste/flavor and less of an avalanche of sugar. This product is a dedicated diabetic friendly product , so, in my opinion, the sugary taste must be diluted/suggested. We need to re-learn from other cultures, particularly from Europeans, how the sweets suppose to be; not aggressive, more like suggested/guessed sweet, and , evidently , much more healthier.The big scale producers might use a scale of sweetness, lets say from 1 to 10 (lets say scale 10 for over 25g sugar per serving), so the customers could make their choice also! Anyway , thanks diabeticfriendly.com.
Hi Lisa, I think you might end up with chocolate syrup if you use honey for the sweetener. You may want to look into granulated honey, which might produce a coarse or grittier texture to the chocolate, but you may still have a chance of getting the chocolate to solidify. If you need any help, please feel free to email me (acleanbake@gmail.com). And welcome to the site! I’m so glad you found me 🙂

Lisa has been creating low carb recipes for herself and sharing them with others since 2010. She loves to experiment in the kitchen and find new ways to create low sugar foods that taste like high carb favorites! Her recipes have been featured on popular magazine sites including Fitness, Shape, Country Living, Women's Health, and Men's Health. Lisa lives in Southeastern Connecticut. Connect with her and Low Carb Yum at:

First, I want to thank you for all of your dedication and work in providing this site. The difficulty of maintaining a healthy weight is a big problem for so many people. My personal question & issue in staying on Keto is my craving for fresh fruit. This a.m I had a large fresh peach along with my “Bullet Proof” coffee. Have I now sabotaged today’s Keto eating?
NOTE: I’m a little nervous about the super sweet blend. I’m imagining that extra stevia has been added to bump up the sweetness. When stevia is added to chocolate, it can increase the bitter flavor compounds in both the chocolate and the stevia. Go slowly and taste as you go. Many THMs have made this recipe and I haven’t heard a complaint yet. Please let me know if you used the GSSS and how it worked. Have a great day. -Kim
Hi! Love this post and concept. I am currently in the midst of a refined grains/sugar-free December. While it was a little bit difficult at first to not indulge in all the holiday treats, I am feeling really good + loving the REAL food + down several pounds. Feeling so good that I think I’m going to continue into January + look forward to following along your journey/getting more yummy recipes! 🙂
Europeans later added sugar and milk, but they were still drinking chocolate instead of eating it until the Industrial Revolution. If entrepreneurs hadn't figured out how to process it further to make it easier to eat (and less expensive), chocolate may not be as universal as it is today. Can you imagine? Americans eat up to 12 pounds of chocolate every year, but we aren't the winners by far when it comes to chocolate consumption -- that honor goes to the Swiss, who wolf down 22 pounds a year [source: World Atlas of Chocolate].

Chocolate is made from cocoa beans, the dried and fermented seeds of the cacao tree (Theobroma cacao), a small, 4–8 m tall (15–26 ft tall) evergreen tree native to the deep tropical region of the Americas. Recent genetic studies suggest the most common genotype of the plant originated in the Amazon basin and was gradually transported by humans throughout South and Central America. Early forms of another genotype have also been found in what is now Venezuela. The scientific name, Theobroma, means "food of the gods".[47] The fruit, called a cacao pod, is ovoid, 15–30 cm (6–12 in) long and 8–10 cm (3–4 in) wide, ripening yellow to orange, and weighing about 500 g (1.1 lb) when ripe.


Update: The old version of the chocolate pudding layer is back by popular demand! I've posted both options above, so you can decide which one you want. The older version takes longer and sometimes people have issues with thickening, but tastes more like pudding when you get it right. The newer version is faster but more like a chocolate whipped cream layer.

Any suggestions for butterscotch pudding to make this with? We always made a half chocolate (on one side not mixed) and half butterscotch which was personal favorites with this combo. No idea where to begin making butterscotch pudding. Will have to research I suppose. BTW we call this Maxine for some reason through our families recipe of this. But I totally get better than sex too. It’s so yummy.
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