Thank you so much for this recipe! A lot of steps – all necessary – but so worth it. This is the best low carb dessert I’ve had! My parents, sister, and I all loved it. I made one change. I stabilized the whipped cream with gelatin, since it will take us a few days to eat it all, and I was afraid it might get watery. I don’t know if that was necessary or not. And you did say that it freezes well. Again, thanks for all your effort perfecting this wonderful dessert!


In the 2000s, some chocolate producers began to engage in fair trade initiatives, to address concerns about the marginalization of cocoa laborers in developing countries. Traditionally, Africa and other developing countries received low prices for their exported commodities such as cocoa, which caused poverty to abound. Fair trade seeks to establish a system of direct trade from developing countries to counteract this unfair system.[121] One solution for fair labor practices is for farmers to become part of an Agricultural cooperative. Cooperatives pay farmers a fair price for their cocoa so farmers have enough money for food, clothes, and school fees.[122] One of the main tenets of fair trade is that farmers receive a fair price, but this does not mean that the larger amount of money paid for fair trade cocoa goes directly to the farmers. The effectiveness of fair trade has been questioned. In a 2014 article, The Economist stated that workers on fair trade farms have a lower standard of living than on similar farms outside the fair trade system.[123]
Hi Stephanie. I’m sorry the dessert did not set well. It could be one of three reasons. First, as you mentioned, it could have been the lactose free cream cheese. Having the dessert refrigerate overnight should have been perfect. The other reason may be because I updated the pudding recipe to have less cornstarch/ arrowroot because people kept complaining that they did not want to use it even though it resulted in a superior recipe. I would suggest adding 1/2 more teaspoons of arrowroot powder. And third, it may have been that the pudding was not cooked enough. It should be really thick after cooking and refrigerating before adding it to the layered dessert. I hope this helps. -Kim
Update: The old version of the chocolate pudding layer is back by popular demand! I've posted both options above, so you can decide which one you want. The older version takes longer and sometimes people have issues with thickening, but tastes more like pudding when you get it right. The newer version is faster but more like a chocolate whipped cream layer.
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While the crust is cooling, make the chocolate pudding layer. In a medium saucepan, combine the heavy cream, almond milk, sugar-free dark chocolate, butter, and powdered erythritol. Cook over medium-low to low heat, stirring frequently, until the chocolate is melted and sweetener dissolves (about 5-10 minutes). Be careful not to get the heat too high to avoid burning the chocolate.

Until the 16th century, no European had ever heard of the popular drink from the Central American peoples.[18] Christopher Columbus and his son Ferdinand encountered the cacao bean on Columbus's fourth mission to the Americas on 15 August 1502, when he and his crew seized a large native canoe that proved to contain cacao beans among other goods for trade.[24] Spanish conquistador Hernán Cortés may have been the first European to encounter it, as the frothy drink was part of the after-dinner routine of Montezuma.[14][25] Jose de Acosta, a Spanish Jesuit missionary who lived in Peru and then Mexico in the later 16th century, wrote of its growing influence on the Spaniards:
The most commonly grown bean is forastero,[49] a large group of wild and cultivated cacaos, most likely native to the Amazon basin. The African cocoa crop is entirely of the forastero variety. They are significantly hardier and of higher yield than criollo. The source of most chocolate marketed,[49] forastero cocoas are typically strong in classic "chocolate" flavor, but have a short duration and are unsupported by secondary flavors, producing "quite bland" chocolate.[49]
Excessive consumption of large quantities of any energy-rich food, such as chocolate, without a corresponding increase in activity to expend the associated calories, can cause weight gain and possibly lead to obesity.[76] Raw chocolate is high in cocoa butter, a fat which is removed during chocolate refining and then added back in varying proportions during the manufacturing process. Manufacturers may add other fats, sugars, and milk, all of which increase the caloric content of chocolate.[76]
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