Update: The old version of the chocolate pudding layer is back by popular demand! I've posted both options above, so you can decide which one you want. The older version takes longer and sometimes people have issues with thickening, but tastes more like pudding when you get it right. The newer version is faster but more like a chocolate whipped cream layer.
I used option 2 that does not call for the xanthan gum. The recipe called for “heavy cream” which I used. Should I have used “heavy whipping cream?” “Pecan meal” I used was “pecan chips” made by “Fisher”. Finally, the parchment paper seemed to disintegrate into the bottom layer of the dessert 🙁 please help! We love this dessert and want to nail it!
* Pecan meal and pecan chips are not the same thing. Pecan meal has a fine consistency, almost like flour, just a tiny bit more coarse. “Pecan chips” are much larger pieces and wouldn’t work the same way, unless you grind them into a meal/flour yourself. Most likely, the extra butter from the crust layer absorbed into your parchment paper because the “pecan chips” wouldn’t absorb it the way an actual pecan meal would.
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The American Academy of Family Physicians defines low-carbohydrate diets as diets that restrict carbohydrate intake to 20 to 60 grams per day, typically less than 20% of caloric intake.[2] A 2016 review of low-carbohydrate diets classified diets with 50g of carbohydrate per day (less than 10% of total calories) as "very low" and diets with 40% of calories from carbohydrates as "mild" low-carbohydrate diets.[18] In a 2015 review Richard D. Feinman and colleagues proposed that a very low carbohydrate diet had less that 10% caloric intake from carbohydrate, a low carbohydrate diet less than 26%, a medium carbohydrate diet less than 45%, and a high carbohydrate diet more than 45%.[16]
I adjusted the servings to halve the recipe. Your ingredient calculator only adjusts the first amount. For example: 300 g/10.5 oz. Unsweetened chocolate. Metric will adjust, but not the imperial. Ingredient measurements switch places for almond flour and powdered erythritol, so it’s the imperial instead of metric measurements that will adjust. Luckily I noticed prior to purchasing or cooking. It looks really good!

In 1967, Irwin Stillman published The Doctor's Quick Weight Loss Diet. The "Stillman diet" is a high-protein, low-carbohydrate, and low-fat diet. It is regarded as one of the first low-carbohydrate diets to become popular in the United States.[52] Other low-carbohydrate diets in the 1960s included the Air Force diet[53] and the Drinking Man's Diet.[54] Austrian physician Wolfgang Lutz published his book Leben Ohne Brot (Life Without Bread) in 1967.[55] However, it was not well known in the English-speaking world.
If you can't have candy with real sugar then these are passable, but not much better, if at all, than say a Hershey sugar-free dark chocolate. Dark chocolate is usually more dense (so not soft, right?) and not as sweet as milk chocolate. These need a firm bite and the overall taste is just ok (but at least there is no chemical after taste as with some sugar free stuff), but they served the purpose. Main gripe is, at least with this seller, you have to order enough candy bars to supply a neighborhood of diabetes patients (like me). So, still searching, but in the meantime munching away at second of 24 bars!
Representing only 5% of all cocoa beans grown as of 2008,[49] criollo is the rarest and most expensive cocoa on the market, and is native to Central America, the Caribbean islands and the northern tier of South American states.[50] The genetic purity of cocoas sold today as criollo is disputed, as most populations have been exposed to the genetic influence of other varieties.
For many people, when trying to lose weight, the answer seems obvious: eat less. Less food means fewer calories, which in turn means less weight, right? But that's not always true. Depending on what you're eating, it's very possible that even if, for example, you skip a meal, you're still making up those calories via snacks or other meals. Further, when your body isn't getting enough calories, it can go into starvation mode.
Some fruits may contain relatively high concentrations of sugar, most are largely water and not particularly calorie-dense. Thus, in absolute terms, even sweet fruits and berries do not represent a significant source of carbohydrates in their natural form, and also typically contain a good deal of fiber which attenuates the absorption of sugar in the gut.[20]

"One of the primary places where you are going to see metabolic changes on any kind of diet is in your gastrointestinal tract -- and that can include a change in bowel habits often experienced as constipation," says Sondike, who is also credited with conducting the first published, randomized clinical trial on low-carb diets. The reason, Sondike tells WebMD, is that most folks get whatever fiber they consume from high-carb foods such as bread and pasta. Cut those foods out, and your fiber intake can drop dramatically, while the risk of constipation rises.
Research into the effectiveness of low-carbohydrate, high fat (LCHF) diets for preventing weight gain and diabetes has produced conflicting results, with some suggestion that diet suitability is not generalizable, but specific to individuals.[11] Overall, for prevention, there is no good evidence that LCHF diets offer a superior diet choice to a more conventional healthy diet, as recommended by many health authorities, in which carbohydrate typically accounts for more than 40% of calories consumed.[11]
Some of the concerns are around micronutrients — supplementation of electrolytes, vitamins, and fiber is often required on low-carb diets, Zeratsky says. And sometimes, these diets can actually lower the blood sugar of a person with diabetes to the point where it’s too low, which is also dangerous. (Low-carb diets are not recommended for those people with type 1 diabetes or anyone on insulin due to that risk, experts note.)
Ok it didnt take long to solidify well in the freezer so that’s reassuring. It tasted great and didnt feel like a weird texture when consuming it. I could not taste the cimmamon at all so idk if i would bother adding at all next time. I did omit the salt this first try as well. Not a fan of salty chocolates. Curious how this would taste with peanut butter mixed in as well. But right now all i was seeking was a plain chunk of chocolate that wouldnt interefere much with a gestational diabetes issue. Diabetes runs in my family, though and when at the store.. i DID find a bar of sugar free from a very good brand, but was bothered as usual by the processed food phenomenon of “whats that ingredient? And that one and that one?” So next time… i won’t heat it on as high a heat and will try simpler version. The fat did not separate out in mine.
My wife and I (and our little family) and becoming quite passionate about avoiding sugar. We were reading an article the other day that says cancer actually feeds on sugar! Yikes. And that cancer isn’t something you just get, it’s something that grows in your body for the long-term, over the course of many years. It’s just not detected until it strikes and it strikes hard. We are so motivated to clean up our act and inspire our kids to eat well. Don’t quote me on the article, that’s just what it said. But eating sugar just can’t be good. Great recipes, love the spaghetti squash one in particular.

I liked this book. It's very well written and researched but at the same time has some very tasty recipes. No doubt about it, sugar is not only bad for you and has empty calories, but Gina Crawford, the author, explains very clearly why it is so bad. She shows the difference between lactose, fructose and sucrose and why they should be avoided. One thing she said that struck me is that "Most baby formula contains the sugar equivalent of a can of Coke (which has a lot of sugar in it). Babies therefore are being metabolically programmed to be sugar addicts from day one." It's hard to get off sugar, it's in almost everything, but what you do is substitute sugar for other less awful, better for you, things. Thus, the recipes in this book all of which look delicious. How about "Nutty Pumpkin Porridge" for breakfast and "Bruschetta with Tomato, Garlic and Basil" for lunch and "Balsamic Lemon Garlic Salmon" for Dinner?


* Pecan meal and pecan chips are not the same thing. Pecan meal has a fine consistency, almost like flour, just a tiny bit more coarse. “Pecan chips” are much larger pieces and wouldn’t work the same way, unless you grind them into a meal/flour yourself. Most likely, the extra butter from the crust layer absorbed into your parchment paper because the “pecan chips” wouldn’t absorb it the way an actual pecan meal would.


I was trying to figure out why mine came out goopy and grainy. It hasnt solidified yet so i will see soon if i messed it up too much. When i was pouring my vanilla extract in it i goofed and over poured so at first i thought that would cause trouble, but figured it would be fine since i planned to just use however many splenda packets seemed necessary by tasting as i go. Then i thought hmm let me add 1/4 tsp of cinnamon and i thought that was the culprit, so i added a little more fairlife milk to help make it more liquid again…. but nope… and the flavor and consistency still wasnt where i wanted it so i added even more vanilla and milk afterf the powdered splenda…. thats when i noticed a bit of bubbling on the edges of the bowl and thought oh crud turn the heat down! I wonder if i should have added more oil but i didnt want to add extra oil and make it so it would never have a chance of solidifying.
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